Try This! DIY Indoor Garden Terrarium Project

The serenity of observing the lush, greenery of a terrarium is almost therapeutic by nature. Fondly, I remember the large terrarium that grew in my childhood home by the terrace door. It was absolutely amazing to behold- and even more amazing as a playspace. Fun times playing in the insect-free soil with all of the assorted garden fixtures may have in time lead to its demise, however the tiny gnomes and plastic woodland animal figurines had been sworn to secrecy. In Homeschool Happenings with my four-year old, we enjoyed a hands-on science lesson by creating our own indoor terrarium with simple materials, basic know-how and our little green thumbs.



DIY Indoor Garden Terrarium Project


The process of creating your own terrarium can become as simple or as complex as you choose. We started our terrarium from small potted plants as opposed to beginning with seeds, which is completely honorable and the most preferred route. Our terrarium is contained in a recycled plastic container with a secure lid. Growing in our little contained garden, we planted a Purple Waffle Plant (Hemigraphis alternata) and a "King's Choice" Ivy (Hedera helix), which will be transplanted into our garden in the Spring. Both plants require medium light and medium water which makes for a compatible pairing.




You Will Need-

* Clear Glass or Plastic Container with Lid

* Gravel, Stones or Rocks
* Small, Plants with Similar Water and Light Needs
* Potting Soil
* Small Trowel or Spoon




1. Add 1-2 inches of gravel, stones or rocks to layer the bottom of the container to help with water drainage.

2. Dampen the potting soil and add 3-4 inches of soil over the bottom layer, depending upon the container and plant size.

3. Remove plants from pots and gently loosen soil and roots.


4. Dig a hole in the soil and space plants in the center of the terrarium away from the edges of the container.

5. Arrange and decorate your terrarium with embellishments as desired.

6. Display your terrarium in a brightly lit area away from direct sun. Observe the soil conditions, removing the lid to water or to allow moisture and condensation to evaporate as necessary.